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Akinola kidnapped: The Church of England Newspaper, January 10, 2014 January 16, 2014

Posted by geoconger in Church of England Newspaper, Church of Nigeria, Crime.
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Nigeria’s Archbishop Peter Akinola was kidnapped on Christmas Eve by armed gunmen on Christmas Eve, but was released unharmed after he refused to pay a ransom.

At approximately 3:00 pm on 24 December 2013, the former Primate of All Nigeria was “carjacked” outside of the offices of the Peter Akinola Foundation Centre for Youth Industrial Training in Abeokuta, the capital of Western Nigeria’s Ogun State. Shortly after his driver pulled onto the Lagos-Ibadan Expressway, a car carrying four gunmen cut off the archbishop’s Toyota Primera and fired pistols into the air.

Their car was forced to the roadside and the gun forced the archbishop and his driver to lie face down on the floor of the back seat.  The car was driven west towards Nigeria’s border with Benin while the bandit who held the archbishop at gunpoint demanded a ransom payment. Archbishop Akinola told the bandits he was a retired clergyman and had not the means to pay ransom.

The kidnappers stopped in a deserted area near the Benin border and after stripping the archbishop and his driver of their clothes, released them into the bush unharmed.

In a Christmas Day interview with the Premium Times, Archbishop Akinola said after he wa released, he made his way through the bush to a road where he “saw a police vehicle coming and there were gunshots, and the police team later came to rescue me from the spot.”

The archbishop had high praise for the police and for Ogun Governor Ibikunle Amosun. “I have to praise them, and I appreciate the governor who left his work to the bush looking for us. It’s unprecedented for a governor to personally lead a team into the bush. He risked his life and yet he didn’t mind that. I’ am deeply touched and impressed,” he said.

Akinola warns of a Nigerian jihad from Boko Haram: The Church of England Newspaper, June 10, 2012 p 7. June 8, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Church of England Newspaper, Islam, Persecution, Terrorism.
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The former Primate of Nigeria has rejected claims that the Boko Haram insurgency in Northern Nigeria is driven by economic deprivation or tribal jealousies.

Speaking to a congregation that included the country’s president, Goodluck Jonathan, and its political elites, Archbishop Peter Akinola lambasted the country’s parlous political state. Human sin, tribal passions and Britain’s determination to get out of Africa before it had prepared the new nation for independence had led to the present state of affairs.

“Shun all political claims that Boko Haram is not against Christianity. It is,” Archbishop Akinola said on 27 May 2012 in a sermon at the National Christian Centre in Abuja in celebration of Democracy Day.

The war has been “going on since 1966. They are committed to Jihad. You can’t stop them it is their religious obligations. They have been doing it for 36 years; they have not stopped and they won’t stop,” Archbishop Akinola said.

Recent press reports in the West have argued that the Boko Haram insurgency is not, at heart, a religious war.  On 24 May 2012 the Voice of America reported that a report by the NGO Human Rights Watch claimed that while the conflict may be along ethnic and religious lines, but the “root of the fighting is often political and economic.”

“We have ignored the truth. Boko Haram must be seen in the right context. It is a continuation of the past,” the archbishop said.

“Boko Haram means Jews and Christians are abomination. They have been unleashing terror since 1966 and they have a mandate. This problem is not peculiar to Nigeria, many other stakeholders are disenchanted but waiting for their time. They want to eliminate infidels which includes you Mr. President,” the archbishop said to the congregation, which included Nigeria’s President Goodluck Jonathan.

Archbishop Akinola warned the country’s leaders gathered for the Democracy Day service that Nigeria had lost its way.  “We are still disunited.  Leaders are interested in their own, no national identity. We are blood thirty and bloodletting society with no regards for sanctity of life. Nigeria is at war against itself. Selfish politicians are doing all things on basis of political exigency.”

Nigeria’s former colonial master had done the country no favours by its hasty grant of independence, the archbishop said.  “A word of truth about our past amalgamation, there was no consent from the South and North. It was done for political and economic gains of the colonials. Our leaders failed to gather the authentic representatives of Nigerians to seek the kind of independent Nigeria they want.”

“This would have led to a new Nigeria,” the archbishop said according to accounts of his speech published in the Nigeria press.

“The euphoria of independence was consequently short-lived,” he said and the “political atmospheres” were now “full of acrimony. There is tribal war. The country has been fragmented with inhibitions to progress.”

The general election of first republic was based on a “faulty census leading to blood-letting that led to the [Biafran Civil War],” he said, as national unity cannot be maintained by “military fiat.”

The 1970s and 1980s in Nigeria were “characterised by unrest, military rule, coup, and armed robbery.” The year 1999 saw the “return of democracy,” but since that time “rather than dealing with the causes, successive governments have been hiding from the truth putting new wine in old bottle.”

“Insecurity has been with us. About 30 crises so far has occurred in the country leading to religious and ethnic cleansing. In 1980 another religious riot with Christians killing took place. In all cases, we have failed to address the causes,” the archbishop warned.

Nigeria’s structural problems were also coupled with the moral failings of its people. “Corruption, the hydra-headed monster, has taken over the soul of Nigeria,” Archbishop Akinola said.

“Officials are stealing us blind,” he said, and they scavenge the country’s “carcass” for their own ends.  Government anti-corruption campaigns were “selective” and short lived. The police and judiciary did not have “clean hands” while the country’s universities had become diploma mills giving honours and “questionable titles” to the powerful.  All of this “will continue because government pays lip service to the fight against corruption,” the archbishop said.

In his address to the gathering, President Jonathan disputed the predictions of further chaos made by Archbishop Akinola. “Even though people are predicting the disintegration of Nigeria, let me assure you that Nigeria will not disintegrate. Though we have these challenges, but we will succeed,” he said.

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Archbishop Okoh urges Nigerians to keep the faith in the face of terror: Anglican Ink, June 4, 2012 June 4, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Ink, Church of Nigeria, Terrorism.
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Archbishop Nicholas Okoh

A lone suicide bomber killed at least 15 people last Sunday in a terrorist attack on a church in Nigeria’s Bauchi state. On 3 June 2012 a terrorist drove into the compound of the Harvest Field of Christ Church, Yelwa, Bauchi State, detonating a car bomb as worshipers began leaving the morning service.

While no group has so far taken responsibility for the attack, police believe the attack was the work of Boko Haram, the radical Islamist sect whose name in Hausa means “Western education is sacrilege.” At least 500 people have been killed in mass terror attacks in Northern Nigeria so far this year – church leaders in Nigeria report the death toll is much higher as sectarian murders in the countryside are seldom reported in the media.

…..

“This synod called the whole of the country not to lose faith.  Because of the bombing and insecurity people were beginning to lose faith in God as if God is not able to protect them,” the archbishop said to the 2nd Session of the 8th Synod of the Diocese of Abuja meeting at St. James’ Church Asokoro, Abuja.

People were also “beginning to lose faith in the entity called Nigeria,” he said. “Individuals also are beginning to lose faith — losing courage in themselves, they feel that everything is collapsing.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Akinola says ‘no’ to Sharia banking: The Church of England Newspaper, July 29, 2011 p 5. August 1, 2011

Posted by geoconger in Church of England Newspaper, Church of Nigeria.
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First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

The former Primate of Nigeria, Archbishop Peter Akinola, has added his voice to the chorus of protest over government-regulated Islamic banks in Nigeria.

Injecting religion into the financial sector while the country wrestled with sharp sectarian divisions was a recipe for disaster, the archbishop said on 10 July at a youth festival in Obantoko, and could lead to the “disintegration” of Nigeria.

However, Muslim leaders have attacked the archbishop, questioning his sincerity in condemning Sharia financial laws.

On 13 January, 2011 the Central Bank of Nigeria released an official circular setting the “Framework for the Regulation and Supervision of Institutions Offering Non-Interest Financial Services in Nigeria.”

The new rules authorized Sharia law-compliant banking under the Fiqh al-Muamalat (Islamic rules on transactions). The Sharia banks would be permitted to take non-interest bearing deposits and to issue Islamic mortgages and loans under government licence.

Central Bank Governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi has denied allegations the new laws broached the line between church and state. Nigerian Muslim leaders have also denounced the criticism of Sharia banking as ignorant, and have objected to the linking of terrorism with Islam.

A statement released on 11 July by the umbrella group the Conference of Islamic Organisations said there was “no link whatsoever” between “Islamic financial institutions and terrorism.”

“We see the attacks against Islamic banking as insincerity and diversionary tactics to heat up the political situation of the country, thereby portraying Islam and Muslims as trouble-makers,” the Muslim group said.

While financial institutions operating on Islamic banking principles can be found in Europe and across the Muslim world, the Nigerian law goes a step further in requiring the new banks be governed by Sharia law. While church leaders have not objected to the creation of private associations that are self-governed by Sharia law, they sharply object to the requirement that the new institutions under state licence be Sharia-compliant.

Archbishop Akinola called on the Church of Nigeria and “all other well-meaning Nigerians to wake up and appreciate the situation.”

“Well-meaning Nigerians must resist all of this by all lawful means and the National Assembly must see the whole thing as an affront” to the Nigerian constitution “which states unambiguously that no particular religion shall be adopted as state religion.”

“Government must take decisive action and promptly cancel everything about the proposed Sharia banking,” the archbishop said, imploring Christians to “rise to defend our faith which is currently on trial” from pro-Muslim government policies and violent Islamist terror attacks.

“We are too comfortable. We must not allow our enemies to win this battle. This is a battle that we must fight and win,” Archbishop Akinola said.

Speaking to the press after last week’s House of Bishops meeting, the current primate of the Church of Nigeria, Archbishop Nicholas Okoh “there is more to Islamic banking than meets the eye.”

The goal of Islamic banking, Archbishop Okoh said, was Islamic evangelism. “In 10 years from now Islamic banking would have grown and matured to what it is intended to be, a religious oppressive instrument and tool for social coercion of the poor to convert to Islam.”

Primates – ‘A crucial and critical point’: TLC 10.13.03 October 13, 2003

Posted by geoconger in Archbishop of Canterbury, Living Church, New Hampshire, Primates Meeting 2003, The Episcopal Church.
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First printed in The Living Church magazine.

Following two days of highly anticipated and lengthy sessions at Lambeth Palace in London, the primates of the Anglican Communion emerged from the tightly secured venue to announce that the Episcopal Church will not face immediate discipline for its controversial General Convention votes on human sexuality last summer. That possibility remains, according to a final unanimous statement released after the meeting which indicated that if the consecration of a non-celibate homosexual person as Bishop of New Hampshire proceeded as scheduled Nov. 2 “we recognize that we have reached a crucial and critical point in the life of the Anglican Communion and we have had to conclude that the future of the Communion itself will be put in jeopardy.”

Cloistered behind the medieval battlements of Lambeth Palace, the primates met Oct. 15-16 in the most important pan-Anglican gathering since the first Lambeth Conference of 1867. And like that first Lambeth Conference, called by the Archbishop of Canterbury in response to a crisis of faith and order occasioned by a bishop, John Colenso of Natal, South Africa, the Primates came to London to decide what to do about a bishop whose election has unleashed theological and doctrinal divisions that may destroy the Anglican Communion.

The affirmation of the election of the Rev. Canon V. Gene Robinson as Bishop Coadjutor of New Hampshire by the 74th General Convention on Aug. 5 and the formal acknowledgement that same-sex blessings are occurring, without disciplinary consequences, in some dioceses has brought the Anglican Communion to the brink of collapse. Prior to the meeting a majority of primates, comprised of most of the Southern Hemisphere, appeared to favor a firm line against the Episcopal Church, with some calling for discipline and even expulsion. Other primates, particularly among those from industrialized countries, have stressed the importance of respecting geographical boundaries and questioned whether the Communion is empowered with disciplinary authority.

The meeting reportedly did not begin well for the Global South coalition when the Most Rev. Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, suggested opening with the Holy Eucharist. The Most Rev. Peter Akinola, Archbishop of Nigeria and the primatial spokesperson for the Global South coalition, said he and the others were not in communion with the Most Rev. Frank T. Griswold, and would not participate if the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church did. Archbishop Williams suggested that if all did not take part in the Eucharist, there would be no meeting. The Eucharist proceeded. Weaknesses in the coalition became further evident when the meeting opened officially and each primate was separately given about 10 minutes to expound on the theological and practical reasons why communion had been jeopardized between the Episcopal Church and his province.

When the expositions were mostly completed, the Primate of Ireland, the Most Rev. Robert Robin Eames, was made available around 4 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon for a brief, unplanned press conference at which he announced that there was unanimous consensus that the Communion was worth preserving and that he had never attended or been involved in a meeting at which “such openness, frankness and honesty” had been expressed. The primates continued to meet while Archbishop Eames conducted the press conference and the meeting on Wednesday did not conclude until after 9 p.m. The meeting ran longer than anticipated the following day as well.

If the theological argument in favor of discipline was weakened by participation in the Eucharist and the individual testimonies, the legal argument that the Anglican Communion was organizationally capable of administering discipline to an errant province was terminated by the Archbishop of Canterbury before it got started when he said he lacked the canonical and ecclesiastical tools to apply discipline at present.

That issue will be addressed thoughtfully based on the primates’ final statement which unanimously called on Archbishop Williams to establish a commission “to consider his [the Archbishop of Canterbury’s] own role in maintaining communion within and between provinces when grave difficulties arise.” The statement goes on to specify that the commission include “urgent and deep theological and legal reflection on the way in which the dangers we have identified at this meeting will have to be addressed.” That part of the commission’s work is requested within 12 months.

“It is clear that recent controversies have opened debates within the life of our Communion which will not be resolved until there has been a lengthy process of prayer, reflection and substantial work in and alongside the commission which we have recommended.”

Bishop Robert Duncan of Pittsburgh was “cautiously optimistic” about the outcome of the meeting prior to its start and expressed gratitude for the primates’ work at the conclusion. Bishop Duncan, along with Bishops John W. Howe of Central Florida, Jack Iker of Fort Worth, and Daniel Herzog of Albany presented the case for intervention by the primates in the “pastoral emergency” in the American Church to a group of primates, led by Archbishop Akinola, at a private meeting held at St. Paul’s Church, Robert Adam Street, London, on Oct. 14. The Rev. David Roseberry, rector of Christ Church, Plano, Texas, and host of the AAC-sponsored conference in Dallas the previous week, delivered to the gathering of 17 primates the signed declarations from the “A Place to Stand” conference.

Hastily moved to St. Paul’s from All Souls’, Langham Place, after The Times revealed the location of the meeting the previous day, the American delegation of four bishops, and AAC president, the Rev. Canon David Anderson, board member the Rev. Canon Martyn Minns, rector of Truro parish, Fairfax, Va., and advisor Professor Christopher Seitz of St Andrew’s University, Scotland, along with representatives of the Anglican Mainstream, a group of English evangelicals formed during the Jeffrey John affair, discussed the consequences of inaction by the primates. Should the primates fail to admonish or discipline the American Church, the AAC said, traditionalist dioceses and parishes would see tremendous losses in membership and financial support as people abandoned the Episcopal Church over the “apostasy” and “heresy” espoused by General Convention.

The primates gathered at St Paul’s told the AAC that they supported the call for reform and renewal of the Episcopal Church. The Archbishop of the West Indies, the Most Rev. Drexel Gomez, the AAC was told, had met privately with Archbishop Williams that morning, and had shared with him the five-point plan prepared at a meeting of primates Sept. 26 in Nairobi. Archbishop Gomez reported, in the words of one of the participants, that Archbishop Williams “has given signals that he is on our side.” A second participant in the meeting told The Living Church that Archbishop Williams had agreed to at least “75 percent of what we wanted, and there may be a further 20 percent that is do-able.”

‘Godly Admonition’ Sought

Based upon two studies, “To Mend the Net” and “True Union,” the five-point plan would first call for the affirmation of the 1998 Lambeth Conference statement on human sexuality. It would also seek a formal declaration that the Episcopal Church and the Canadian Diocese of New Westminster had violated Church teaching as summarized in the Lambeth declaration. The primates would issue a “godly admonition” coupled with a call to repentance given to the American Church and Bishop Michael Ingham of New Westminster. If they did not recant their errors and persisted in following a course of conduct and teaching contrary to the mind of the wider Church, disciplinary measures would be taken. The American Church and New Westminster would be expelled from the Anglican Communion and a new reformed ecclesial body would be reconstituted in North America in communion with Canterbury and the Anglican Communion.

Following the meeting, Bishop Herzog said the primates unequivocally supported four of their five points, with the fifth — discipline — still a possibility in the future.

The Rev. Michael Hopkins, rector of St. George’s, Glenn Dale, Md., and past president of Integrity, said the primates’ final statement was one with which gay and lesbian Episcopalians could live, particularly given some of the statements prior to its start.