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Anglican Unscripted Episode 93, February 21, 2014 February 22, 2014

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Church of England, The Episcopal Church.
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Anglican Unscripted is the only video newscast in the Anglican Church. Every Week Kevin, George, Allan and Peter bring you news and prospective from around the globe.

Story Index
00:00 A House in Wisconsin
16:08 Interview with Bishop Salmon
24:28 Where’s Welby?
30:27 Agnostics Have Theology
44:50 The New Iron Lady
49:10 Facebook Diplomacy
53:22 Closing and Bloopers

ACNA priest appointed Six Preacher at Canterbury: The Church of England Newspaper, January 24, 2014 February 3, 2014

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The Archbishop of Canterbury has appointed a priest of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) to serve as one of the Six Preachers of Canterbury Cathedral.

The appointment of Dr. Tory Baucum, rector of Truro Parish in the ACNA’s Diocese of the Mid-Atlantic marks the first official recognition or honor by Canterbury of an ACNA priest. Archbishop Robert Duncan of the ACNA noted the appointment was “historically significant.”

Dr. Baucum “is known to be a gifted teacher and preacher who is committed to the present day reformation out of which the Anglican Church in North America was born,” he said.

In the statement released on 16 Jan 2014, the Lambeth Palace press office noted the political symbolism of the appointment.

“While Dr Baucum has extensive experience of preaching, evangelism and peace-making, his appointment is also recognition of his commitment to reconciliation, which is one of Archbishop Justin’s ministry priorities. Truro Church seceded from the Diocese of Virginia and the Episcopal Church in 2006 and subsequently became part of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). When Dr Baucum became Rector in 2007, the church and the diocese were involved in litigation over property rights. Dr Baucum, a priest in ACNA, developed a close friendship with the Episcopal Bishop of Virginia, the Rt Revd Shannon Johnston, and a settlement was subsequently reached.”

Archbishop Welby stated: “The close friendship [Baucum] has forged with Bishop Shannon Johnston, despite their immensely different views, sets a pattern of reconciliation based on integrity and transparency. Such patterns of life are essential to the future of the Communion. I hope and pray that Tory’s presence as one of the Six Preachers will play a part in promoting reconciliation and unity amongst us.”

ACNA keeps the filioque clause: Anglican Ink, October 17, 2013 October 17, 2013

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The decision to keep the filioque clause in “Texts for Common Prayer” represents a victory of common sense over special interests writes George Conger and is a mark of the political and theological maturity of the Anglican Church of North America.

On 18 October 2013 the ACNA released its long awaited Eucharistic liturgies. The document entitled “Texts for Common Prayer” retained the language of the double procession of the Spirit, the filioque, but permitted its omission when reciting the creed.

A draft text released in June had called for the omission of the “and the son” or filioque clause following the statement: “We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life, who proceeds from the Father.”

Read it all at Anglican Ink.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 82: September 28, 2013 September 29, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of Kenya, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Church of England, Church of Pakistan, GAFCON, Property Litigation, The Episcopal Church.
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Legal loss for Ontario ACNA parish: Anglican Ink, September 16, 2013 September 17, 2013

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An Ontario parish of the Anglican Church in North America has lost its appeal of a lower court ruling that awarded its parish property to the Anglican Church of Canada’s Diocese of Huron.

Last week the Court of Appeal of Ontario upheld a 15 August 2011 ruling of the Superior Court that held the property and assets of St Aidan’s Church in Windsor, Ontario did not belong to the parish, but were held in trust by a congregation on behalf of the diocese and the Anglican Church of Canada.

Read it all at Anglican Ink.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 80: August 31, 2013 September 1, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Church of England, Episcopal Church in Jerusalem & the Middle East, Fort Worth, South Carolina, The Episcopal Church.
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Published on Sep 1, 2013

Anglican Unscripted is the only video newscast in the Anglican Church. Every Week Kevin, George, Allan and Peter bring you news and prospective from around the globe.

STORY INDEX:
Communion Bishops go to Canterbury 00:00
Texas & South Carolina Victories 07:23
Teaching Americans how to speak English 18:11
It is Just a War 31:50
Trimming the dead branches 39:38
Closing and Bloooopers 44:21

Anglican Unscripted Episode 78, August 9, 2013 August 10, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of Aotearoa New Zealand & Polynesia, Anglican Church of Australia, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Church of Tanzania, Anglican.TV, Archbishop of Canterbury, Church of England, Episcopal Church in Jerusalem & the Middle East, Property Litigation, The Episcopal Church.
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Anglican Unscripted is the only video newscast in the Anglican Church. Every Week Kevin, George, Allan and Peter bring you news and prospective from around the globe.

STORY INDEX:

Silly Story Month 00:00
News from Sydney 08:06
Egypt and Zanzibar 12:06
AS Haley 18:03
Peter Ould 32:42
Closing and Outtakes 40:51

Boy Scouts of America end gay scout ban: The Church of England Newspaper, June 2, 2013, p 7. June 12, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Church of England Newspaper, Human Sexuality --- The gay issue, The Episcopal Church.
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The national council of the Boy Scouts of America has voted to permit scout troops to enroll gay members, but has upheld a ban on homosexual scout masters.

On 23 May 2013, the 1400 delegates to the BSA’s national council meeting in Grapevine, Texas voted by a margin of 61 per cent to 39 per cent to rescind its ban and allow a local option on gay scouts.

“This has been a challenging chapter in our history,” the BSA chief executive, Wayne Brock, said after the vote. “While people have differing opinions on this policy, kids are better off when they’re in Scouting.”

Thursday’s vote was presented as a compromise between the existing policy and calls by gay activists to end the ban on gay boys and adults.  After the vote the BSA released a statement saying it did not condone any sexual activity by scouts and did not want to be drawn into the political battle over homosexuality. “The Boy Scouts of America will not sacrifice its mission, or the youth served by the movement, by allowing the organization to be consumed by a single, divisive and unresolved societal issue,” it said in a statement.

America’s churches, which sponsor over 70 per cent of scout troops were divided over the vote. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints said it had supported the change but the Southern Baptist Convention said it was opposed.

“We are deeply saddened,” said Frank Page, president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s executive committee. “Homosexual behavior is incompatible with the principles enshrined in the Scout oath and Scout law.”

On 27 March 2013 the Most Rev, Robert Duncan, Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America wrote to the chief scout executive and national president of the BSA voicing opposition to the proposed change.

“In consideration of the proposed membership policy change allowing sponsors of scouting units to determine their own membership guidelines with regard to sexual orientation, please know that the policy of the Anglican Church in North America does not support homosexual activity. Consequently, we would not support this change in our scouting troops,” Archbishop Duncan said.

Writing in the Washington Post’s On Faith section last week the Rev. Susan Russell urged change. “It is time to refuse to allow what is best about Scouting to be held hostage by homophobia. It is time to stop being blackmailed into bigotry by the increasingly strident voices from the fringe who insist that continued discrimination is their price tag for participation. It is time for equality.”

The prominent Episcopal Church gay activist noted the Episcopal Church supported lifting the ban. “We have been having this discussion for a very long time. Over a decade ago at its 2000 General Convention, the Episcopal Church adopted a resolution to ‘Encourage the Boy Scouts of America to allow membership to youth and adult leaders irrespective of their sexual orientation’.”

Anglican Unscripted Episode 72, May 18, 2013 May 18, 2013

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Episode 72 of Anglican Unscripted brings even more news about the Anglican Church (Communion) around the world. Kevin and George talk about stories from Tanzania and Nigeria, who are dealing with internal conflict and Muslim-on-Christian violence.

It is also time to give an update on the Temporary Same Sex Liturgies the Episcopal Church passed at General Convention last year and who is using them and who is not.
AS Haley updates all the major legal cases around the country and discusses the late breaking news from The Falls Church.

Peter Ould talks about the growing conflict and investigation in Jersey. It is hard to tell if the biggest issue is jurisdiction or lack of trasparency.
Finally, in the blooper real at the end of the episode (after the credits) one of our contributors reveals a hidden talent. #AU72 Comments to AnglicanUnscripted@gmail.com

Anglican Unscripted, Episode 71, May 10. 2013 May 14, 2013

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In this week’s Episode your host talk about the latest legal heartbreak in California. Also this week, there is late breaking international news about a Bishop who accidentally invokes Scripture. AU’s Legal segment covers all of the court cases in the US, and Kevin interviews David Jenkins about his lawsuit from Bishop Byrd. #AU71 Comments: AnglicanUnscripted@gmail.com

Easter messages from across the Communion: The Church of England Newspaper, April 7, 2013 p 6. April 9, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of Aotearoa New Zealand & Polynesia, Anglican Church of Australia, Anglican Church of Canada, Anglican Church of Kenya, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Church of Southern Africa, Church in Wales, Church of England Newspaper, Church of Ireland, Church of Nigeria, Church of the Province of Uganda, Church of the Province of West Africa, Scottish Episcopal Church, The Episcopal Church.
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Easter messages from the overseas leaders of the Anglican Communion sounded a common theme this year of hope and joy. While the archbishops of the church touched upon issues of local concern, each spoke to the victory of Christ over death and the grave.

The Archbishop of Uganda Stanley Ntagali urged Christians not to lose heart in the face of economic and political uncertainties. “There could be social pressures in the country and many people might have lost hope. Many people no longer trust fellow human beings, but let the risen Lord Jesus whose victory over death we are celebrating this Easter give us a new hope.”

He also warned of the dangers of alcohol. “I urge our people not to celebrate [Easter] by drinking. They should go to church and worship the Lord and return home. This a time to repent and make our homes, offices, schools and business places more enjoyable and suitable to glorify God who gave us the greatest gift of salvation through his Son Jesus Christ,” he noted.

Archbishop Eliud Wabukala of Kenya, Chairman of the GAFCON Primates’ Council, also spoke of the joy found in life in Christ. “In his resurrection from the dead there is the glorious ‘yes’ of the fulfilment, actual and yet to come, of the promises and purposes of God. Through repentance and faith we share in his risen life and at its heart, our calling is to simply say the ‘Amen’ and glorify the God who has triumphed over sin and death.”

The GAFCON leader also urged Christians to reject the “ungodly innovations” coming from Western liberal churches which seek to “substitute human effort and speculation for divine grace and revealed truth.  It is a profound contradiction to say this ‘Amen’ and then go on, as some do, to deny the real physical resurrection of Jesus.”

When Christians say ‘no’ to false teaching it is for the sake of truth. “There can be no more positive a movement than one which gives an unqualified ‘Amen’ to the fulfilment of all God promises in Jesus Christ.”

The Archbishop of West Africa Dr. Tilewa Johnson said the Christian’s response to the sufferings was to turn towards God. “Where to start? We have tools and guidelines to hand. One of the greatest tools we have is prayer. Prayer is a means of communication with God.”

“As with so many things, it requires practice. We know what it is like when we become close to another human being – a husband, wife, brother, sister or close friend. In time it is possible to read their thoughts, and know what they are going to say before they say it. It is the same with God. To sit in the presence of God – maybe in silence; maybe with a few words – it is possible increasingly to come to know God and the will of God. Gradually we know the way to go,” the Gambian archbishop said.

The Primate of All Nigeria, Archbishop Nicholas Okoh said that when celebrating Easter it was “important” to “re-emphasize the incontrovertible fact that Jesus has risen from the dead and He is alive for ever. Through His resurrection power, therefore we can overcome all sorts of challenges we might have as an individual, as the Church of God and as a Nation.”

The Archbishop called on “all Christians and Nigerians as a whole to reaffirm their trust in God, and in corporate Nigeria.”

“Let us remain resolute and resilient, having our hope in the strength and power of the Almighty God. Our prayer for our country, Nigeria is that we shall overcome the present challenges of lingering insecurity: bloodshed, destruction of lives and property; poverty and political squabbles. We should keep hope alive of a corporate Nigeria,” he said.

Preaching at the Easter Vigil at the Cathedral of St. George the Martyr in Cape Town, Archbishop Thabo Makgoba told the congregation he had just returned from a retreat in “frozen rural North Wales”, staying in an attic room overlooking the Irish Sea in the mountains of Snowdonia.

“I was there to follow the 30-days Full Spiritual Exercises of St Ignatius of Loyola,” he explained “to explore what God was wanting to do in my life.”

But even found that the spiritual journey did not end there as God was leading him “to integrate all I’ve experienced and learnt into my ministry and life” –  “And I certainly came back to find an awful lot had been going on,’ he said.

“The over-riding lesson of my retreat is that God, in his redeeming love, is everywhere. Nothing is beyond his care, or his desire to bring healing and new life to you, to me, to everyone,” the archbishop said.

“If you truly want to know what Easter is all about, look at the places where there are tough challenges, difficult issues, hard wrestling, painful contexts – and where God’s people nonetheless dare to go, and to stay for as long as it takes, witnessing to light and hope and life.” Archbishop Makgoba said.

In in his final Easter message before he retires in July the Archbishop of Sydney Dr Peter Jensen reflected on his tenure in office. “As I think on my time as Archbishop, naturally I look back and try to judge myself – not with much success!” he says. “Like you, I have a real judge. Think how much more God, who knows all the secrets of our hearts, must be able to hold me to account. It should make us tremble.”

But Easter filled him with hope. “What happened at the first Easter reminds me of the love of God. Through the death of Jesus even I, and all of us, can have forgiveness as we turn to him in sorrow and trust him for our lives” he says.

“Our failures are not the last word over our lives. And, through the resurrection of Jesus I have a great and undeserved hope of my own resurrection and future,” Dr. Jensen said.

Archbishop-elect Philip Richardson of New Zealand reminded Kiwi Christians that “life comes out of death; the horror of crucifixion bears the fruit of redeemed and renewed humanity; the worst that we are capable of becomes the access way to that intimacy of relationship with God that Christ makes possible; it is in the bowl and towel of the servant that true power is expressed; it is in losing ourselves that we are found.”

The “heart of the message of Easter,” he observed was not the “passion or the suffering, but the resurrection.”

“As Martin Luther King rightly reminded us, ‘Hate begets hate, anger begets anger, killing only begets more killing. The only thing that can turn an enemy into a friend is the power of love’,” he said.

In a joint message released with the leader of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, Archbishop Fred Hiltz of the Anglican Church of Canada celebrated the bonds of friendship between the two denominations and also urged Christians to “pray for the peace of Jerusalem”.

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori the Episcopal Church stated: “Easter celebrates the victory of light and life over darkness and death.  God re-creates and redeems all life from dead, dry, and destroyed bones.  We are released from the bonds of self-obsession, addiction, and whatever would steal away the radical freedom of God-with-us.”

At Easter “our lives re-center in what is most holy and creative, the new thing God is continually doing in our midst,” she said, “practicing vulnerability toward the need and hunger of others around us” thereby cultivating “compassionate hearts.  We join in baptismal rebirth in the midst of Jesus’ own passing-over.”

The Archbishop of the Anglican Church in North America, writing from Juba where he was standing holy week with Archbishop Daniel Deng of the Episcopal Church of the Sudan, wrote: “This Easter I am looking back,” he said – “I am asking, ‘What does it all mean?’ Whether in Juba or in Pittsburgh – and wherever you find yourself – what I testify is that the Gospel is my strength and my song, and that Jesus has become my salvation.”

“Easter is the day that lights and gives meaning to all the others, wherever I – we – spend it and with whomever I – we – spend it.  The tomb is empty.  The world, the flesh and the devil are defeated.  Jesus is alive.  In Him, the alien becomes familiar, loss becomes gain, sorrow becomes joy, and death becomes life.  This Easter I am also looking around and looking ahead,” Archbishop Robert Duncan wrote.

The Archbishop of Armagh Dr. Richard Clarke said what Ireland need this Easter was “confidence – a full–blooded confidence – that we actually want to allow Christ to run loose and dangerous in the world around us. We need to recover that spirited confidence to assert that Jesus Christ, crucified and risen, is not our private property as churchy people, but is truly for the whole of society and the entire world.”

Dr. Barry Morgan the Archbishop of Wales in his Easter sermon preached at Llandaff Cathedral stated that: “If you wanted to sum up God’s work, He is a God who is in the rescue business.  That is the root meaning of the word ‘salvation’ – it means being saved from something or someone.”

“Because of Jesus’ death and resurrection, we too as members of His body, are rescued from sin, despair, meaninglessness, disaster, and death,” he said, adding that “this offer of rescue, of salvation, by Jesus, is for all people not just for the select few – a bit like being rescued by a lifeboat.   When a life-station receives a distress signal, no enquiry is made about the social status of those who need rescuing, or whether they can pay for the service, or whether they are at fault for having got themselves into danger in the first place by being careless in going out without life jackets when a storm was forecast.  Lifeboats simply go to the rescue.”

The Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church Bishop David Chillingworth of St Andrews, Dunkeld & Dunblane stated: “We greet with joy the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.  We look forward to welcoming many people to worship in our churches at Easter.  We hope and pray that they will experience joy and hope in our congregations.

“As disciples of Jesus Christ, we believe that we are people of the resurrection.  We are Easter people – shaped in our baptism through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.  We feel deeply the pain of the world and its people.  We bring compassion and care to the ministry which we exercise in our service of others.  We have a passion for justice.  We are also people of hope.  Because of the resurrection, we believe that good will triumph over evil and life over death.”

Anglican Unscripted Episode 68, March 22, 2013 March 22, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Church of England, The Episcopal Church.
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Dust off the Herald Trumpet and dry clean your vestments as we have a new Pope and a new Archbishop of Canterbury this week, meanwhile your AU hosts refuse to gush and talk at the same time. Also this week there are more details regarding the scandal over the elections in Tanzania and news from the Jersey shore… the other Jersey shore. Kevin talks with a special guest and George breaks next weeks top story this week. Comments to anglicanunscripted@gmail.com and tweet: #AU68

Additional Complaints Filed in Tanzania: Anglican Ink, March 7, 2013 March 7, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Church of Tanzania, Anglican Ink, Corruption, GAFCON, The Episcopal Church.
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Three complaints have been lodged with the Anglican Church of Tanzania (ACT) by members of the church’s general synod alleging misconduct and fraud in the conduct of last month’s election of an archbishop.

On 3 March 2013 Dr Dickson Chilongani, Provincial Secretary of the ACT, released a statement announcing the election of the Rt. Rev. Jacob Erasto Chimeledya “as the new Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Tanzania.”

However supporters of the sitting archbishop, Valentino Mokiwa of Dar es Salaam, cried foul. A 27 Feb 2013 complaint seen by AI has alleged eight constitutional irregularities in the voting, including the casting of four more ballots than electors present. The claim put forward by Dr. Chilongani was ingenuous, they added, stating that while the House of Bishops may have endorsed the election, the Lay and Clergy Houses of Synod had not.

Read it all in Anglican Ink

ACNA to review women’s orders: The Church of England Newspaper, January 20, 2013 p 6 January 25, 2013

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Church of England Newspaper, Women Priests.
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The College of Bishops of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) has agreed to launch a Task Force examining the question of the Holy Orders of women clergy.  Meeting last week in Orlando, the ACNA bishops set down a five part protocol studying the question of women clergy in conjunction with the issues of Prayer Book reform, the creation of a Catechism for the church, and a review of its ecclesial structures.

In ordering their priorities, the bishops decided to begin with a study of Scripture and church traditions and them move to the creation of church policies.  One bishops told The Church of England Newspaper the ACNA bishops wanted to ground their actions in doctrine, rather than find a doctrine to support their actions.

The election and translation of five bishops were approved by the College of Bishops, while time was also spent seeking to heal the hurts caused by the break-up of the Anglican Mission in America last year.

The ACNA currently permits dioceses to ordain women to the diaconate and priesthood, but not to the episcopate.  However, Forward in Faith and the Anglo-Catholic Diocese of San Joaquin have urged the province to review its “two integrities” structure.

The bishops announced they had appointed a task force to study the doctrine of Holy Orders – not limiting their work to the question of women clergy – and would begin by with the Bible and then move to a study of doctrine and tradition.

At Phase 4 “the Task Force will discuss the arguments, pro and con, related to the ordination of women, considering the relevant Scriptural texts and historical arguments, and reviewing studies conducted within and without the Anglican tradition.”

The College of Bishops said that before final action is taken, their recommendations will be passed to the theological commission of the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans.  The conservative reform movement within the Anglican Communion is divided on the question of women clergy with Uganda, Kenya and Rwanda strongly in favor, while Singapore, Sydney and the Anglo-Catholic provinces of Africa are opposed.

A report on overlapping dioceses and episcopal jurisdictions was also presented to the College.  A communique from the meeting stated the ACNA sought to bring the church into conformity “with historic Anglican practice. The goal of the work is to organize each region for the long-term sustainability of the movement in recognizable, godly Anglican Church structures.”

The bishops received a map showing the location of each of the their 951 congregations, which enabled the bishops to identify “11 regions of overlapping mission work among the various jurisdictions of the Province.”

While no diocese or group was slated for elimination, the bishops’ communique stated the challenge of overlapping jurisdictions “will result in enhanced collaboration, responsive structures and ministry oversight, with better sharing of resources, clearer communication and more profound unity in the mission that we share.”

Women clergy under review for the ACNA: Anglican Ink, January 11, 2013 January 11, 2013

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More bishops, fewer dioceses and the future of women clergy were amongst the main topics of debate at the Anglican Church of North America’s College of Bishops meeting this week in Orlando.

Bishops from the conservative province in waiting in North America in the Anglican Communion approved the election of two additional bishops for the PEAR-USA Network. The Rev. Quigg Lawrence will lead the Atlantic Regional Network and the Rev. Ken Ross the Western Regional Network, while the Very Rev. Clark Lowenfield was elected bishop of the Diocese of the Western Gulf Coast – a diocese in formation.

The bishops also confirmed the election of the Rt. Rev. Charlie Masters as bishop coadjutor of the Anglican Network in Canada and approved the translation of the Rt. Rev. Frank Lyons from the Diocese of Bolivia to the Diocese of Pittsburgh as assistant bishop.

Time was also spent in mending fences amongst the College between the three former members of the Anglican Mission in America and the wider ACNA, following the protracted break up of the group.

A report on overlapping dioceses and episcopal jurisdictions was also presented to the College.  A communique from the meeting stated the ACNA sought to bring the church into conformity “with historic Anglican practice. The goal of the work is to organize each region for the long-term sustainability of the movement in recognizable, godly Anglican Church structures.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Papal meeting for Anglican conservatives: The Church of England Newspaper, January 6, 2013 p 3. January 4, 2013

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Archbishop Robert Duncan (centre) and Bishop Ray Sutton (right) of the ACNA at the 28 Nov 2012 General Audience with Pope Benedict XVI

The leader of the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans, Archbishop Eliud Wabukala of Kenya, held a private meeting last month at the Vatican with Pope Benedict XVI.

On 28 Nov 2012, Archbishop Wabukala, Archbishop Robert Duncan and Bishop Ray Sutton of the Anglican Church in North America, along with a retired bishop from the Church of England met with Benedict and officials from the curia in private after the Wednesday General Audience.

Details of the conversation have not been released however, Benedict has long held an interest in the internal workings of the Anglican Communion.  In October 2003, as President of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger sent a letter of encouragement on behalf of Pope John Paul II to those attending the “Plano Conference” of conservative Episcopalians in Dallas, Texas, who had gathered to voice their opposition to the impending consecration of Gene Robinson as Bishop of New Hampshire.

Pope Benedict has also focused much of his energies on Africa. A recent issue of the Jesuit magazine La Civiltà Cattolica stated the pope has referred to Africa as to the “lung” of the Catholic Church and the church in Africa was “currently the most dynamic continent from the point of view of the expansion of the Church and of Christianity in general, and where vocations are the most numerous in terms of percentage.”

Travel delays prevented Archbishop Wabukala from attending the General Audience with Archbishop Duncan and Bishop Sutton, though the archbishop and other leaders of the global reform movement within the Anglican Communion were present at the afternoon’s private session.

Connecticut school shooting leaves America in mourning: The Church of England Newspaper, December 23, 2012 p 7. December 28, 2012

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Church leaders in the United States have responded with horror to last week’s Connecticut school shooting, calling upon Anglicans to turn towards God in prayer in response to the murder of 26 people – including 20 school children.

On 14 Dec 2012, Adam Lanza (20), shot and killed his mother at their home and then proceeded to her workplace, the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.  Police have yet to release a timeline of events, but armed with a variety of pistols taken from his mother’s home, Lanza entered the school killing six teachers and administrators and the members of his mother’s class – 20 children ranging in age from 5 to 7 years of age.

Lanza then took his own life before police arrived on the scene.  The motive for the killings is unknown as are details of the killer’s life – though acquaintances described the young man as troubled.

Archbishop Robert Duncan of the Anglican Church in North America urged his flock to pray for the victims and their families. “Please join us in praying for the victims of and families affected by Friday’s shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT. “Grant us grace fearlessly to contend against evil and to make no peace with oppression; and, that we may reverently use our freedom, help us to employ it in the maintenance of justice in our communities and among the nations,” he wrote.

Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori wrote the Episcopal Church grieved with those who had died and mourned the loss “of lives so young and innocent.  We grieve that the means of death are so readily available to people who lack the present capacity to find other ways of responding to their own anger and grief.  We know that God’s heart is broken over this tragedy, and the tragedies that unfold each and every day across this nation.  And we pray that this latest concentration of shooting deaths in one event will awaken us to the unnoticed number of children and young people who die senselessly across this land every day.”

Speaking at a memorial service in Newtown High School on 16 December, President Barack Obama said he was “very mindful that words cannot match the depths of your sorrow, but whatever measure of comfort we can provide, we will provide. … Newtown, you are not alone.”

“These tragedies must end, and to end them we must change,” the president said, saying he would call upon law enforcement and mental health experts to “prevent another tragedy like this.”

The shooting has prompted a national debate over the causes of “rampage” killings, with some blaming a changing culture, others loose gun control laws, while others have questioned state programs of closing state mental hospitals in favor of community care.

In statement released after the shootings on Friday, the Bishop of Washington Mariann Budde announced that she was “calling on our national leaders to enact more effective gun control measures. We know from experience that such calls go unheeded. But what if this time, you and I took up this issue and wouldn’t put it down until something was done? . . . Today we grieve, but soon we act.”

However, conservative columnist Mona Charen argued the problem also lay in failed health policies as “misplaced civil libertarianism and romanticization of mental illness led to deinstitutionalization” of the mentally ill so that “now, 95 percent of the inpatient beds we had in 1955 are gone.”

There were a “a small subset of mentally ill people who are dangerous. They are responsible for an estimated 50 percent of rampage killings. In the name of personal autonomy, we have made it almost impossible to force them to get treatment. The horrifying consequences are all around us,” she said.

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Hiltz calls on Canterbury to say “no” to the ACNA: Anglican Ink, December 19, 2012 December 20, 2012

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The Archbishop of Canterbury-designate Justin Welby and Archbishop Fred Hiltz of Canada

The leader of the Anglican Church of Canada has lobbied the Archbishop of Canterbury-designate not to extend formal recognition to the Anglican Church in North America. However, the decision who is an Anglican does not rest with the Archbishop of Canterbury.  The communion’s formal statement as to who is an Anglican looks to fellowship with the Archbishop of Canterbury and fidelity to the doctrines and disciplines set forth in the Book of Common Prayer.

The 6 Dec 2012 meeting at Auckland Castle, Durham with Bishop Justin Welby was one of four stops for Archbishop Fred Hiltz, who also met with the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr. Rowan Williams at Lambeth Palace and with the general secretary of the Anglican Consultative Council, Canon Kenneth Kearon, in London, and preached at Southwark Cathedral.

According to the Anglican Journal, Archbishop Hiltz said he mentioned his ongoing concern about efforts by the ACNA to be recognized by the Church of England. Archbishop Hiltz said he requested that if bodies of the Church of England are to meet with representatives of ACNA, “in fairness, they should also meet with us to get a better picture.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Papal meeting for conservative Anglican leaders: Anglican Ink, December 11, 2012 December 12, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Anglican Ordinariate, Roman Catholic Church.
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At the close of the General Audience of 28 Nov 2012, the leader of the Anglican Church in North America, Archbishop Robert Duncan met with Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican.

Archbishop Eliud Wabukala of Kenya, leader of the Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans, was to have also attended the General Audience, but was delayed. Joined by the chairman of the ACNA’s ecumenical relations commission, Bishop Ray Sutton of the Reformed Episcopal Church, Archbishop Duncan spoke with the pope.  The three later met with Vatican officials.  Details of the conversations have not been released.  Claims of the significance of the meeting or of its symbolism are also premature, one Vatican watcher said, until the substance of the conversation is known.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

REC proclaims second cathedral for Diocese of Mid America: Anglican Ink, December 11, 2012 December 12, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Reformed Episcopal Church.
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The Reformed Episcopal Church has proclaimed its second cathedral for the Diocese of Mid America. At an evensong service on 2 Dec 2012, Bishop Royal Grote announced that the Church of the Holy Communion in Dallas, Texas had been named a pro cathedral for the diocese which covers 18 central and mid-western states.

In his address, Bishop Grote recognized the significant role of leadership that Holy Communion and its rector, the Rt. Rev. Ray Sutton – the bishop coadjutor of the diocese, had played in the development of the Diocese.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Church of England will not break with South Carolina: Anglican Ink, November 19, 2012 November 20, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Church of England, South Carolina.
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The Church of England has declined to accept Presiding Bishop Katherine Jefferts Schori’s assertion the Diocese of South Carolina may not withdraw from the Episcopal Church.  Nor will Saturday’s vote by the South Carolina Special Convention affect the standing of its clergy with the Church of England at this time, General Synod learned today.

Speaking for the church’s Council for Christian Unity (CCU), Bishop Christopher Hill said the Church of England sought to maintain good relations with all sides in the Episcopal Church’s civil war and would take no “hasty” actions at this time.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Charlie Masters elected Bishop of ANiC: Anglican Ink, November 15, 2012 November 15, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink.
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Bishop Gerald Mpango speaking to Bishop Charlie Masters in Dar es Salaam

The Anglican Network in Canada (ANiC) synod has elected the Rt. Rev. Charles Masters to be bishop coadjutor of the Anglican Church in North America’s diocese in Canada.

Delegates to the ANiC synod meeting representing the ANiC’s 69 congregations and 4000 active members met at SS Peter and Paul Anglican Church in Ottawa on 14 November 2012 to select a successor to Bishop Donald Harvey, who has announced his retirement.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Bribery allegations false, Archbishop declares: Anglican Ink, November 13, 2012 November 14, 2012

Posted by geoconger in AMiA, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Church of Rwanda, Anglican Ink, Corruption.
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The Most Rev. Onesphore Rwaje, Archbishop of Rwanda

Allegations the Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Rwanda (PEAR) solicited a $250,000 gratuity from the Anglican Mission in America and its refusal led to the breach with the African church are baseless, church leaders tell Anglican Ink.

Rumors have circulated on the internet for the past few days accusing the Rwandan primate of graft. “I learned from an unimpeachable source today that Rwandan Archbishop Rwaje had asked Bishop Chuck Murphy for $250,000 to build a home,” one message shared on a popular Anglican news portal alleged.

Speculation attached to the rumor said the refusal of Bishop Murphy to agree to the shakedown  might have been behind his “downfall from Rwanda.”

Archbishop Onesphore Rwaje of Rwanda told Anglican Ink the accusations were “not true.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

All Saints Pawleys Island votes to join the ACNA: Anglican Ink, November 9, 2012 November 9, 2012

Posted by geoconger in AMiA, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink.
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All Saints Pawleys Island

Anglican Mission in America has voted to join the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA).

At a parish meeting on 5 Nov 2012, All Saints Church in Pawleys Island, South Carolina was asked to give its support to one of two propositions. Proposal 1 would affiliate the historic congregation with the ACNA, while proposal 2 would align the church with the Anglican Mission in America’s (AMiA) Society for Mission and Apostolic Works.

Parish by laws required 51 per cent approval for a change in affiliation or 316 votes.  With a quorum present, proposal 1 received 322 votes and proposal 2 received 229 votes.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Virginia Supreme Court accepts Falls Church appeal: Anglican Ink, October 29, 2012 October 29, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Property Litigation, Virginia.
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The Falls Church

A three-member writ panel of the Virginia Supreme Court has voted to review the case of the Episcopal Church v. The Falls Church.

On 26 October 2012 the court’s website stated it had “granted” The Falls Church’s petition for appeal of the March 2012 order issued by Virginia Circuit Court Judge Randy I. Bellows granting trusteeship of the property and control of the congregation’s assets to the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Virginia.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 52: October 12, 2012 October 12, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil, Anglican.TV, Church of England, Church of Ireland.
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Kevin and George bring the latest Anglican News from around the world. This week they discuss the state of Religious News Reporting, the retirement of Charles Bennison, the new Archbishop of Canterbury, Vatican II and much much more. Twitter #AU52 Comments to AnglicanUnscripted@gmail.com

Recife elects new bishop: The Church of England Newspaper, September 30, 2012 p 6. October 2, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil, Church of England Newspaper, La Iglesia Anglicana del Cono Sur de America.
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Bishop-elect Miguel Uchoa of Recife

The rector of the largest Anglican parish in South America has been elected Bishop of Recife. On 15 Sept 2012 the Rev. Miguel Ângelo de Andrade Uchoa Cavalcanti, rector of the Paróquia Anglicana Espírito Santo in Jaboatão dos Guararapes in the state of Pernambuco was elected fourth bishop of the diocese in succession to the late Dr. Robinson Cavalcanti.

Two candidates stood for election and on the first ballot Fr. Uchoa received 79.5 per cent of the lay and 69.3 per cent of the clergy votes from the 58 lay and 52 clergy delegates present, defeating the rival candidate, suffragan Bishop Evilásio Tenório.  In 2005, the bishop and almost all of the Recife clergy were expelled from the Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil.  Bishop Cavalcanti, his clergy and approximately 90 per cent of the congregations moved under the oversight of the Anglican Province of the Southern Cone and are linked to the Anglican Church in North America.

In a statement released after the synod, Bishop-elect Uchoa said he was humbled by his election.  It was now his duty to “fulfill God’s call to this new phase of my life and ministry. But, I must emphasize, that the call does not just happen in my life. It is a call to our diocese, for the people, the clergy, the leaders of all communities, for the whole Church of Christ gathered in the Diocese of Recife” to “serve God and to align with His perfect will.”

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Virginia Supreme Court schedules hearing for The Falls Church case September 26, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Property Litigation, The Episcopal Church, Virginia.
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The Rev. John Yates and The Falls Church

The Supreme Court of Virginia has directed The Falls Church to present oral argument to a writ panel on 16 October 2012 in support of its petition to throw out a lower court decision turning over its property to the Diocese of Virginia.

In a 25 September 2012 statement, Henry Burt, secretary of the Diocese of Virginia said The Falls Church attorneys will be given ten minutes of oral argument to “persuade the Court to hear their appeal on the merits. The Supreme Court will decide whether it will hear the case in a few weeks after the hearing. If the appeal is accepted for argument, it is likely to be heard in the first half of next year.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 49, September 13, 2012 September 14, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Archbishop of Canterbury, Church of England, South Carolina.
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Kevin and George are back from news blackout break with Anglican News from around the globe. They discuss Rowan’s exit interview, South Carolina, Archbishop Duncan’s interview and Much, Much More. #AU49 Comments to AnglicanUnscripted@gmail.com There might even be some bloopers.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 48, August 18, 2012 August 18, 2012

Posted by geoconger in 77th General Convention, AMiA, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Archbishop of Canterbury, Archbishop of York, Canon Law, Church of England, Church of the Province of Uganda, Church of the Province of West Africa, South Carolina.
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Not a week goes by (even in August) when the Unscripted team can’t dig up some interesting news. Kevin and George discuss the “new thang” with AMiA and the turmoil at Pawley’s Island. They also reveal some Crown Commission secrets, Anglican Job Postings and Affinity Dioceses. Peter Ould talks about an Englishman trying to sell more books and Allan gives some interesting history about leaving and staying in TEC at the same time.

All Saints Pawleys Island may go ACNA: Anglican Ink, July 30, 2012 July 31, 2012

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The flagship parish of the Anglican Mission in America – All Saints Pawleys Island – is set to vote at a special parish meeting this fall on its rector’s proposal the congregation join the Anglican Church in North America.

The Rev. Robert L. Grafe, Jr.,  rector of the founding parish of the AMiA, told Anglican Ink his congregation was entering a “season of prayer and discernment.”

He noted that a “change in affiliation requires an amendment to our by-laws and a parish vote,” which could take place later this year.

In a 27 July 2012 letter to the congregation, Mr. Grafe wrote that in the wake of the December split within the AMiA “it became clear that there would be other Anglican options for affiliation to consider.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Fort Worth files Motion for Expedited Oral Argument: Anglican Ink, July 6, 2012 July 7, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Fort Worth, Property Litigation.
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Attorneys for Bishop Jack Iker and the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth have filed a Motion for Expedited Oral Argument with the Texas Supreme Court to adjudicate its property dispute with the national Episcopal Church and its Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

The motion filed on 6 July 2012 noted that on 23 April “an amicus brief was filed in this case by seven bishops and three priests of The Episcopal Church (TEC). The brief supported the Fort Worth Diocese’s arguments that, should Texas adopt the Deference approach rather Neutral Principles for church property disputes, the final authority in the Episcopalian tradition on such disputes is the local bishop, not TEC’s national administrative office.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 43, June 18, 2012 June 18, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Church of Rwanda, Anglican Covenant, Anglican.TV, Canon Law, Church of England, Church of Ireland, Property Litigation, Scottish Episcopal Church.
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After a one week hiatus George and Kevin return. Allan Haley brings breaking news from the Supreme Court concerning TEC churches and the Dennis Canon. Your hosts talk about their adventures at the Anglican Church in North America’s Assembly, including the topic everyone was ‘not’ talking about. David Ould brings news from Australia and England while his twin brother Peter is enjoying a vacation with is family at Eurodisney.

No inter-communion for conservative Anglicans and Lutherans in North America: The Church of England Newspaper, June 10, 2012 p 7. June 13, 2012

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The Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod and the Lutheran Church—Canada have released a joint statement of pastoral principles, but were unable to enter into inter-communion due to the historic doctrinal and ecclesial differences between Anglicans and Lutherans.

On 25 May 2012, the leaders of the three churches released a statement summarizing 18 months of talks.  While they shared common moral views, doctrine divided the conservative Lutheran churches from the ACNA.

The President of the LCMS – an American Lutheran denomination 2.3 million baptized members in more than 6,000 congregations – Dr. Matthew Harrison stated that “in a time when there is a widespread failure to recognize the biblical teaching regarding the creation of man and woman and their biblical roles, life-issues, and other grave challenges that society faces, it is a joy to find a group of Christians within the Anglican Church in North America who affirm this biblical teaching, and who desire to cooperate in externals with the Missouri Synod in upholding the biblical natural law in society.”

The ACNA’s Archbishop Robert Duncan stated that it was a “great blessing to be walking alongside” the LCMS as the two shared “an unwavering commitment to the authority of Scripture.”

“We look forward to continuing our work together for the Gospel through prayers, evangelism, dialogue, encouragement of one another, and joint efforts to help those in need,” Archbishop Duncan said.

The ACNA and the two conservative Lutheran churches shared a common view of the Trinity; professed the Apostles’, Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds; and “we recognize the Fall into sin and the reality that only by grace through faith in Christ can fallen human beings find justification and salvation. We rejoice together in one Baptism for the remission of sins and the new life given through this sacrament. In the confession of these truths, we also recognize and affirm that they are known through the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, the very Word of God written, which are the infallible basis for all church teaching.”

The churches also said that “we look toward the possibility of joint statements on important issues facing our churches and our culture such as questions about homosexuality and abortion. We also anticipate opportunities to work together to address human needs like hunger, homelessness, and other ministries of mercy toward those in crisis.”

However, the ACNA and the LCMS would not be able to enter into inter-communion as Anglicans did not subscribe to the historic Lutheran confessions.

“We recognize that further discussion is needed regarding issues of ecclesiology” the churches said, particularly the “office of bishop (its definition, nature, and necessity).”

“Disagreement exists among Anglicans about the propriety of ordaining women to the pastoral (presbyteral) office, while the LCMS opposes this practice”, and “We recognize that further discussion is needed regarding our respective understandings of the real presence of Christ in the Lord’s Supper and the administration of this sacrament.”

However, the churches were encouraged by what they had in common.  Dr. Robert Bugbee, president of the Lutheran Church—Canada, stated: “Despite the decay in foundational Christian teaching among mainline churches in North America, the Lord is opening doors for us to encourage each other to root our work in the apostolic Gospel of Christ and in the Scriptures as God’s infallible Word.”

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Property settlements in Ontario announced: The Church of England Newspaper, June 10, 2012 p 7. June 13, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of Canada, Anglican Church of North America, Church of England Newspaper.
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The congregation of St Hilda’s leaving church for the last time. Photo: David Jenkins

Three Ontario parishes of the ACNA have reached a settlement with the Diocese of Niagara to end five years of litigation following their secession from the Anglican Church of Canada.

On 31 May 2012 the Anglican Network in Canada (ANiC) announced that the congregations of St. George’s in Burlington, St. Hilda’s in Oakville and the Church of the Good Shepherd in St. Catharines would turn over their properties to the diocese on 1 June.

The agreement allowed the congregations to keep certain “worship, liturgical and memorial items”.  Each party also agreed that it would be responsible for its own legal costs and would foreswear any further litigation.

The diocese also agreed to pay to one departing congregation the costs of recent property improvements.  The diocese and congregations also agreed to share the proceeds from the sale of a rectory.

The three Niagara congregations were among a dozen parishes that voted in February 2008 to quit the Anglican Church of Canada and join ANiC.  Canadian Archbishop Fred Hiltz condemned the departures, writing on 28 Feb 2008 that the defections were unnecessary.

The capacity for a “breadth of theological perspective” was part of the Anglican “heritage that we continue to cherish, Archbishop Hiltz said.

However, defections were been driven by a desire to remain Anglican, the executive director of ANiC told The Church of England Newspaper.

“If we did not offer them an option by the end of the year,” Cheryl Chang told the CEN, many said the “would leave Anglicanism altogether.”

The Diocese of Niagara did not respond to our query as of our going to press, but a warden at the Church of the Good Shepherd, Patricia Decker, stated the parish was “deeply grateful to God for this settlement which frees us from the threat of further litigation.”

Mrs. Decker stated the congregation was “not naïve about the challenges of continuing our ministry in temporary rented facilities, but these inconveniences are completely overshadowed by the joyful anticipation of new ministry opportunities and the blessings God has in store for us as we take this step.”

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Women clergy and doctrine dividing the Orthodox from ACNA June 9, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Orthodox Church in America, Polish National Catholic Church, Women Priests.
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Metropolitan Jonah of the OCA addressing the ACNA Assembly in Ridgecrest, NC on 8 June 2012

The Metropolitan of the Orthodox Church in America, His Beatitude Jonah has called upon the Anglican Church of North America to ditch women clergy, Calvinism and the filioque in the name of Christian unity.

This is an “opportunity to return your church to its original catholic heritage” Jonah told delegates attending the ACNA’s 2nd Assembly at the Lifeway Conference Center in Ridgecrest, NC on 8 June 2012.

The ACNA can “overcome generations of schism, a schism forced upon the English church” by Rome if it eliminates the filioque from the Nicene Creed, the Orthodox leader said. The Filioque – the phrase “and from the Son” is a clause found in the Western Christian Church but not in the Eastern Churches.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Alan Hawkings named Anglican 1000 vicar: Anglican Ink, June 7, 2012 June 7, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink.
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Archbishop Robert Duncan introducing the Rev. Alan Hawkins (left) to the ACNA Assembly as the Rt. Rev. Todd Hunter (right) looks on

The Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) has named the Rev. Alan Hawkins to serve as the Vicar of the Anglican 1000 movement, Archbishop Robert Duncan told delegates to the church’s 2nd Provincial Assembly.

Archbishop Duncan told delegates on the opening day of the 7-9 June 2012 meeting in Ridgecrest, N.C., that Mr. Hawkins, the rector of the Church of the Redeemer in Greensboro, NC, will supervise the province’s church planting initiative – a work the archbishop characterized as being the “central” program of the province.

In a statement released by the ACNA, Mr. Hawkins said it was “humbling and a privilege” to head up the work of Anglican 1000, the “cornerstone of the Anglican Church in North America and I look forward to being able to encourage and support the planting of new churches in our tradition throughout North America.”

At the 1st Provincial Assembly in 2009, Archbishop Duncan challenged the ACNA to plant 1000 congregations within five years.   Assembly Archbishop Duncan called upon the ACNA to plant 1000 new congregations.  The rector of Christ Church Plano, the Rev. Canon David Roseberry and the Rev. Daniel Adkinson answered the archbishop’s call by helping start a church planning program that has helped spur the ACNA’s rapid growth over the past three years.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

2011 a ‘challenge’ for the ACNA, Archbishop reports: Anglican Ink, June 7, 2012 June 7, 2012

Posted by geoconger in AMiA, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink.
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Archbishop Duncan addressing the ACNA provincial council

The year 2011 could have been the Anglican Church in North America’s annus horribilis, Archbishop Robert Duncan told the bishop and delegates attending its fourth provincial council meeting at the Ridgecrest Conference Center in Western North Carolina on 6 June 2012.

But at year’s end the ACNA was the stronger for its engagement with the chaos surrounding the collapse of the Anglican Mission in America. “The only way to explain what has happened is to speak of God’s hand and God’s favor” the archbishop said in his presidential address.

While heavy fog greeted the bishops and council members at their mountain retreat, grey skies were not evident inside the council chamber. Delegates told Anglican Ink they were upbeat and hopeful for the future of the province-in-waiting of the Anglican Communion – a message shared by Archbishop Duncan in his state of the church address.

The archbishop opened his address by noting that although the past year had been a “challenge,” “greater unity globally has also been achieved.”

The ACNA’s relationship with the Church of Rwanda “has never been closer” he said, and noted the FCA primates council “has also gone far deeper in relationship because of the AMiA crisis and we are far more committed to one another personally than ever before.”

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Anglican TV Episode 42, June 2, 2012 June 2, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of Canada, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Consultative Council, Anglican Covenant, Anglican.TV, Church of England, Property Litigation, Virginia, Women Priests.
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So much news so little time. In this week’s Anglican Unscripted Kevin, George, Peter, and Alan bring you the latest Anglican News. Peter brings news of a Diamond Jubilee and Women Bishops in England. Alan delivers the latest supreme court news from The Falls Church. Kevin and George talk about a cancer in the Anglican Communion and updated betting on the next Archbishop of Canterbury.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 41, May 25, 2012 May 27, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of Australia, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Church of England, The Episcopal Church.
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This weekend Kevin and George discuss Anglican’s first historian, the Tale of Two Ladies, and AUs new Canterbury Sweepstakes feature. Our Contributors bring news from England, Australia, and the USA. Comments to AnglicanUnscripted@gmail.com To donate to Georges trip to General Convention goto http://www.Anglican.tv/donate

Anglican Unscripted Episode 40: May 21, 2012 May 21, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, ARCIC, Church of England, Church of Ireland, New Hampshire.
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Kevin and George bring news from the Episcopal Church and a General Convention resolution to allow Communion without Baptism. Ireland passes motion 8 during their General Synod despite creative use of Roberts Rules. The Roman Catholic church met with Anglican leaders in Hong Kong for the third time. New Hampshire is going to elect a new Bishop tomorrow. Canon Phil Ashley explains how AMiA Bishops are moving into ACNA and which Canons are helping that transition.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 40: May 21, 2012 May 21, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, ARCIC, Church of England, Church of Ireland, New Hampshire, The Episcopal Church.
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Kevin and George bring news from the Episcopal Church and a General Convention resolution to allow Communion without Baptism. Ireland passes motion 8 during their General Synod despite creative use of Roberts Rules. The Roman Catholic church met with Anglican leaders in Hong Kong for the third time. New Hampshire is going to elect a new Bishop tomorrow. Canon Phil Ashley explains how AMiA Bishops are moving into ACNA and which Canons are helping that transition.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 39, May 11, 2012 May 11, 2012

Posted by geoconger in AMiA, Anglican Church of Canada, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Church of Ireland, Property Litigation, The Episcopal Church.
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Kevin and George are at it again. This week they tackle the tough topic of people in purple, The Anglican Mission in America, Same Sex Marriage, and communication in in the church. Peter has breaking news from Ireland and AS Haley brings legal news from Orange Beach California. Comments to AnglicanUnscripted@gmail.com and twitter #au39

Bishop Todd Hunter joins the ACNA: Anglican Ink, May 8, 2012 May 8, 2012

Posted by geoconger in AMiA, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Church of the Congo, Anglican Ink.
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Bishop Todd Hunter

Bishop Todd Hunter of the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) has been received by the Anglican Church in North America and will serve as an assistant bishop in the office of the primate, the Most Rev. Robert Duncan.

On 4 May 2012 the California-based bishop held a conference call with Archbishop Duncan, Bishop Chuck Murphy of the AMiA, and Bishop Terrell Glenn of PEAR-USA/ACNA to discuss his future plans.

Bishop Hunter stated that he had a “warm and collegial conversations” with the three bishops and “articulated for each of them my vision of C4SO becoming a servant to all the various Anglican entities within North America. C4SO will happily plant churches in partnership with PEARUSA, TheAm and the ACNA.”

C4SO – Churches for the Sake of Others – is a church planting initiative run by Bishop Hunter that will now move under the ecclesial oversight of the ACNA.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

Anglican Unscripted Episode 38, May 5, 2012 May 6, 2012

Posted by geoconger in AMiA, Anglican Church of North America, Anglican.TV, Archbishop of Canterbury, Church of England, Church of Ireland, Texas, The Episcopal Church.
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The Anglican Four have more news for you. Kevin and George bring you Today-in-History, More of The AMiA breakdown, Erastian Texans, picking Canterbury, and the weather for Ireland is spring. Peter breaks down behind-the-scenes GAFCON and AS Haley has breaking news from Christ Church, Savannah. Oh… and there is a surprise Guest this week.

ACNA receives two AMiA bishops: Anglican Ink, April 30, 2012. May 1, 2012

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Bishop Foley Beach

The Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) has received two bishops from the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) as honorary temporary assistant bishops.

The Rt. Rev. T.J. Johnston will serve as an assistant bishop to the Rt. Rev. Foley Beach of the Anglican Diocese of the South and the Rt. Rev. John Miller will serve as an assistant bishop to the Rt. Rev. Neil Lebahr of the Gulf Atlantic Diocese, Anglican Ink has learned.

A memorandum of understanding dated 18 April 2012 endorsed by Bishops Johnson and Miller and by Bishop Leonard Riches and Charlie Masters on behalf of the ACNA states the agreement serves to “provide a temporary jurisdictional connection” and will last for 180 days, with an interim review at the 90 day mark.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

U.S. property cases may go to the Supreme Court: The Church of England Newspaper, April 6, 2012 p 7. April 10, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Church of England Newspaper, Connecticut, Fort Worth, Georgia, Property Litigation, Virginia.
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Four of the Episcopal Church’s key property dispute cases have moved to the state and U.S. Supreme Courts for review.

Briefings have been filed in the Episcopal v. Anglican Dioceses of Fort Worth cases in the Texas Supreme Court, while the breakaway congregations in Northern Virginia have asked the Virginia Supreme Court to review the lower court’s ruling giving the diocese custody of the parish properties.

The breakaway congregations in Christ Church v. Diocese of Georgia and Bishop Seabury Church v. Diocese of Connecticut have filed writs of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court.  The Supreme Court has also been asked to review a third property dispute, Timberridge Presbyterian Church v. the Presbytery of Greater Atlanta, that addresses the same legal issues.

The issue before the courts, as summarized in the Bishop Seabury petition, is whether the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution “requires state civil courts to enforce an alleged trust imposed on local church property by provisions in denominational documents, regardless of whether those provisions would be legally cognizable under generally applicable rules of state property and trust law.”

The American state courts are divided and have made contrary rulings based on their interpretation of Jones v. Wolf.  Five state supreme courts and one federal circuit court hand held that denominational property trust rules such as the Episcopal Church’s Dennis Canon should only enforced in civil court if they were in conformance to “objective, well-established concepts of trust and property law,” while four state supreme courts have enforced “denominational documents asserting a trust regardless of whether those documents are other ‘embodied in some legally cognizable form’.”

Canon lawyer Allan Haley noted the legal question being presented to the Supreme Court is the quasi-establishment of one group of churches over others that has arisen since the Jones v. Wolf decision.

In interpreting the Jones decision some state courts have permitted the canon law of the Episcopal Church, and other ‘hierarchical’ churches to take precedence over state law in property disputes.  Mr. Haley argued that “no other body or organization — religious or otherwise — has been granted the privilege of creating enforceable trusts in such a unilateral fashion.”

The state court decisions in favour of the Episcopal Church have relied upon obiter dictum (a remark made as an aside, in the course of a decision) made by Justice Blackmun in the Jones case.  This remark “suddenly become the law of the land, sufficient to override all state and local laws to the contrary? That is not how the law is supposed to work,” Mr. Haley said.

The “practical effect” has been to grant “special State privileges to just one type of church. And that ‘establishment’ of one type of church over all other types, and over all other kinds of property owners as well, quite plainly is contrary to the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, as applied to the several States through the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution,” Mr. Haley argued.

However, writing in the Washington Post, the Bishop of Virginia, the Rt. Rev. Shannon Johnston argued the issues should be seen through the lens of theology. “We are called to be good stewards of property given to us by our forebears. Stewardship is a theological concept: we give thanks for the gifts God has given to us all. Stewards are bound to preserve gifts for future generations,” the bishop said

“The matter of biblical interpretation is at the heart of the issues, and there are real differences. Differences over biblical interpretation, not authority, remain unsettled. Even so, the common, ancient tradition as to authority, polity and property stands with the diocese and its bishop,” he argued in support of the diocese’s legal campaign.

The Supreme Court is not obligated to hear the petitions from the state courts as four of the justices must agree to hear a case before it is brought before the court.  The court is expected to announce whether it will review the church cases at the close of its current term in June or at the start of the next term in October.

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Bishop Seabury case appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court: Anglican Ink, March 24, 2012 March 24, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Anglican Ink, Connecticut, Property Litigation.
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The Ven. Ronald Gauss

Bishop Seabury Church in Groton, Conn., has filed a writ of certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court asking for a review of the Connecticut Supreme Court that upheld the Episcopal Church’s Dennis Canon.

Last week lawyers for the former Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut congregation, which now is part of the Anglican Church of North America, filed a 44 page petition with the court asking for review.  Only a fraction of the cases appealed to the Supreme Court are reviewed, however there is a likelihood the case may be heard as it covers legal issues addressed in two petitions filed in response to rulings by the Georgia Supreme Court: the case of Christ Church v. the Diocese of Georgia and the case of Timberridge Presbyterian Church v. Presbytery of Greater Atlanta.

 

A copy of the 12 March 2012 U.S. Supreme Court filing of the case of Gauss v. the Diocese of Connecticut may be found here.  A copy of the petition in Timberridge Presbyterian Church v. Presbytery of Greater Atlanta may be found here.

Read it all in Anglican Ink.

VA cases conclude: The Church of England Newspaper, March 9, 2012, p 7. March 15, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Church of England Newspaper, Property Litigation, Virginia.
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A Virginia court has rejected the plea of the state’s Attorney General to revisit his decision granting ownership of the property and assets of seven breakaway congregations.  On 1 March 2012, Fairfax County Circuit Court Judge Randy Bellows said the ACNA-affiliated congregations must turn over their properties to the Diocese of Virginia by 30 April 2012.

On 22 Feb 2012, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli filed a brief in support of a motion filed by the congregations asking the court to reconsider its decision ordering all property be turned over to the diocese including funds donated by parishioners.  He argued that donor intent not canon law should govern the disposition of the charitable donations under Virginia law.

Virginia Bishop Shannon Johnston stated he hoped last week’s ruling will “mark the end of this lengthy litigation” and allow the diocese to focus its energies “on mission and ministries.”

A spokesman for the breakaway congregations stated that “while our congregations will comply with the final order, we are saddened that the Circuit Court did not accept the motion for partial reconsideration and we continue to believe that, as a matter of religious liberty, it is the right of donors to restrict the use of their own gifts to the church of their choice.”

We “prayerfully considering their legal options,” said Jim Oakes, the spokesman for the breakaway churches.

The logic used by the court and the Episcopal Church was “Heads we win; tails you lose,” canon law scholar Allan Haley observed.

“The first sentence of the Dennis Canon [the church’s property canon] lets them claim all of the parishes’ property because they could not leave the Church, while the second sentence has to be read to mean the opposite of what it says” to allow the court to reach the finding it did.

“The parish can certainly continue to spend its money to keep up the grounds, the buildings and the mortgage, but they are to receive no credit for having done so and having thereby ensured that the property would still be valuable and in good condition when the Diocese took over possession,” Mr. Haley wrote, stating it was “obvious” the court and the Episcopal Church had not “bothered to think through the consequences of their reasoning.”

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

Virginia cases back in court: The Church of England Newspaper, March 2, 2012, p 5. March 8, 2012

Posted by geoconger in Anglican Church of North America, Church of England Newspaper, Property Litigation, Virginia.
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Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli

The Attorney General of Virginia has filed a motion in the property dispute between the Episcopal Diocese and seven breakaway congregations that have affiliated with the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) break, asking the court to reconsider its January ruling that all property donated to the churches prior to 31 January 2007 be turned over to the diocese.

On 22 Feb 2012, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli filed a brief in support of a motion filed by the congregations, asking Judge Randy Bellows to reconsider his decision ordering all property be turned over to the diocese as donor intent governed the disposition of the charitable donations under Virginia law.

Beginning in 2003 the seven congregations permitted their members to designate whether their congregations may be passed on to the national church or the diocese.  By 2006 almost all of the donations received by the congregations were restricted by the donors for the use of the congregation.  This donor intent governed the disposition of property, the attorney general argued.

In its 27 February response the diocese argued the congregations’ argument had no “legal or factual merit.”

Donor intent has no place in “a neutral principles of law analysis,” the diocese argued, and there is “no violation of religious freedom because no donor is being or has been compelled or coerced to contribute” to the diocese or national church.

Parish spokesman Jim Oakes stated the “core issue” under review was the “right of donors to restrict the use of their own gifts to the church of their choice.”

The parishes believed this was a “religious liberty issue at its core as the courts are not lawfully able to coerce contributions to a specific religious entity against the wishes of the donors. We ask that the court honor the gift restrictions designated by individuals that have faithfully offered their contributions to these congregations,” said Mr. Oakes.

First printed in The Church of England Newspaper.

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